Moscato

The Moscato grape has been cultivated for centuries in almost the entire Italian peninsula. However, it is now primarily grown in Piedmont. Its name is derived from the word ‘Muscum’ or ‘musk’, given the grape’s strong aroma.

Moscato is primarily grown in a climate of moderate temperature, which is helpful to harvesting, since if picked too early, the grape tends to be acidic and will lack a fully developed aromatic profile; if picked too late, it will feature an unappealing geranium aroma. Summertime is the peak time for harvest. The grape’s skin is thin, and so if harvesting is left till September, heavy rains can easily break the skin. The natural fruitiness of the grape is manifested at its best when harvested in summertime.

Moscato is distinctive in its delicate taste, which is light and bubbly, with an emphasis on sweetness and fruitiness. While Moscato can be produced dry, the sweet version is infinitely more popular.


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